REFORESTATION

MYANMAR, Kyaing Tong

Objective

Prevention and reduction of impact of deforestation and climate change in Shan State

Beneficiaries

386 farmers,  42 rural villages

Partners

Ministry of Agriculture, Deparment of Social Welfare (DSW), Local Commuinities, Department of forestry in Kyaing Tong

Donors

PIME foundation, CEI, OBOS

PROJECT

The project, started up in 2014, aims to reduce the impact of growing deforestation and of soil erosion in last few years due to the implementation of agricultural techniques which aren’t eco-friendly at all.  

This project is rising from the understanding that awareness alone is not enough to safeguard forestry reserve, but it is necessary also to offer to local population also interesting alternatives. Coffee and tea are plants which find in forestry ambience the perfect conditions to grow, and investment in those crops it’s the key to protect the forest and, at the same time, to grant a good income to farmers in the area. 

For this reason we decided to start agricultural trainings to promote those crops, good agricultural practice and techniques to prevent soil erosion, sustainable farming.  Land tenure is also an important topic for our training, in order to fight land grabbing and make farmers the legal owners of their lands.

Meanwhile the project foresees also the management of nurseries for the distribution of plants for reforestation of specific areas, previously deforested for the cultivation and then abandoned, and also the formation of “Forestry preservation” groups in villages.

CONTEXT

Myanmar is a predominantly rural country: most of population(72%) lives in rural areas and agriculture and related activities still are main income sources.

Deforestation is one of the biggest challenges in Myanmar, especially in Kyaing Tong area.

Most of the territory is occupied by forests, from which the population is gaining firewood and construction wood. In rural villages they’re using firewood to cook and for heating; even in bigger city, such as Kyaing Tong, 90% of families is still using wood to cook or for productive activites such as tea drying.

Furthermore we should consider also Thek trafficking, an high-quality wood which grows especially in those forests and whom commerce is not always legally managed.

In this area, as in the whole country, there isn’t any plan about forestry management which rules the deforestation.

If we’re not able to act a global level, then it’s essential to reduce the impact of deforestation through simple actions directly into the villages.

 

VILLAGES

FARMERS

COFFEE/TEA PLANTS PLANTED

FRUIT PLANTS PLANTED

SCIONS DISTRIBUTED

NEWS

NAN SU, BEYOND HER PREJUDICES

NAN SU, BEYOND HER PREJUDICES

In this third chapter of STORIES FROM ANOTHER WORLD, we are going to tell you Nan Su’s story, a young girl who works in our local staff for the I C.A.R.E. programme in Kyaing Tong. Nan Su has a little disabled sister and before working with I C.A.R.E., they didn’t get...

read more
THAN TUN AUNG OVERCOMES ALL OF HIS FEARS

THAN TUN AUNG OVERCOMES ALL OF HIS FEARS

  Here is the second chapter of our "STORIES OF THE OTHER WORLD". This week we talk about Than Tun Aung, a boy who wanted to continue studying, but was blocked by fear. Thanks to Dayamit College he managed to overcome his limitations and has now become one of the...

read more
UPDATES FROM KYAING TONG

UPDATES FROM KYAING TONG

2022 was a good year for our projects in Kyaing Tong, in the eastern part of Shan State: New Humanity continued its activities on rural development, training and disability support and the results are very encouraging for the future! In the AGRICULTURAL SECTOR,...

read more